How to Email a Case in Fastcase

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Want to quickly send a case via email to yourself, a colleague, or a client?  Just follow these simple steps:

  1. When you are browsing a case, simply click on the Email link towards the upper right hand side of the page.
  1. This will bring you to the E-mail Document window. Here you can enter in the recipient’s e-mail address.  The e-mail address you used to register with Fastcase will always be filled in by default, but you can click in the Send E-mail To: box and change the e-mail address to anything you like.
  1. Click on the Send Email That’s it!  The case you selected will be delivered shortly.  The e-mail will be from noreply@fastcase.com and the case text will be in the body of the e-mail.

Remember:  To ensure that Fastcase e-mails are not caught by your junk e-mail or spam filters, add noreply@fastcase.com to your list of trusted senders.

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Top Ten Reasons to Attend LPM-TECH

2016 LPM TECH Logo

Deep in the heart of the Capital City lies the beautiful Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, the setting for the 6th Solo and Small Firm Conference, LPM-TECH, on September 16th. Those who have attended the previous conferences in the past are quick to point out that “it is the single best investment any lawyer can make in their practice.” WHY? Here are the top ten reasons why South Carolina lawyers and their staff don’t want to miss LPM-TECH 2016:

  1. It’s the largest single day of law firm management and law office technology for the year in South Carolina.
  1. The topics focus on the areas of greatest concern to SC lawyers. This year’s focus includes sessions on: cyber threats, business development, cloud computing, retirement strategies, personnel management, e-mail management, website design, social media, plus a lot more!
  1. A great opportunity for SC Lawyers to earn 6.0 MCLE credit hours, including up to 2.0 LEPR credit hours and 1.0 SA/MH credit hours all in one CLE!
  1. A chance to meet other solo and small firm attorneys around the State. A chance to network with managing partners and legal professionals from around South Carolina.
  1. An opportunity to learn about new legal technology.
  1. An opportunity to gain new practice pointers and tech tips that you can take back with you to use in your practice on Monday morning after the conference.
  1. A chance to meet the South Carolina Bar Solo and Small Firm Section Council and provide feedback on what you would like to see the Section doing to further help SC solos and small firms, like yourself.
  1. An opportunity to meet over 20 law practice management and technology vendors all under one roof and check out new software and tech tools.
  1. A chance to gain insight into what other local practitioners are doing in their practices
  1. An opportunity to get help with a specific problem in your practice

Don’t miss South Carolina attorneys’ favorite seminar of the year! For more information or to register, visit www.scbar.org/lpmtech.

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Should I or Should I Not Upgrade to Windows 10? – A Look at Hardware & Software Requirements + Resources: Part 2

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PREFACE: In researching this blog post, we were surprised to find a lot of information for PC users and Attorneys to sort through. We have attempted to highlight the most important information and resources we could find on this subject. We encourage our readers to evaluate your own situation as a Windows user and make the best decision that works for you. Because there is so much information, we have split this post into two parts (see Part 1 here).

PART 2 – What hardware & application software requirements should I evaluate before upgrading to Windows 10? What problems might I face if I don’t do this?

Once you determine that you own Windows 7 or Windows 8 and verify that you qualify for the Windows 10 upgrade, then you want to check your PC hardware. In addition to doing that, you also want to check with all hardware/software vendors you use, to make sure your current hardware/software is compatible with the Windows 10 upgrade. This includes researching any major practice management software you use for your firm. Why is this important? Because the problem that many users have had with Windows 10 is that their hardware or software was not compatible for the upgrade to work properly and some users were upset to discover that the free Windows 10 version has some feature deprecation, meaning that in the process of upgrading, Windows was removing software that was no longer compatible.

Some users have also experienced Windows 10 automatically updating without their knowledge or permission, meaning they lost key incompatible software or files they needed. (Check out the lawsuit most recently in the news.) While most people (individual users and not law firms) have not had a problem with upgrading and not having a backup, it is important to establish a full backup of your computer and have a record of all product keys because these days you just never know. It is also good to note for law firms to note that some Legaltech experts express that there are some privacy concerns with Windows 10. Other tech experts feel that Microsoft has done a good job in being transparent about those concerns and there are many who really like Windows 10 a lot better than its predecessors, including some experts with PC Mag.

And, what other resources are out there to help me make my decision?

Regardless, there seems to be a great divide on what legal professionals and even everyday PC users should do. The Bar cannot and does not make decisions for lawyers, but we can provide a lot of the information that is out there to help lawyers make these kinds of decisions. Below are a couple of great articles (and a podcast) to check out as you decide what works best for you and your practice:

Why Windows 10 isn’t free

10 reasons why you shouldn’t upgrade to Windows 10

Should businesses upgrade to Windows 10?

Should I upgrade to Windows 10? Why upgrade to Windows 10?

Why Your Office Should Care about Upgrading to Windows 10

5 reasons to upgrade to Windows 10

Windows 10: What Lawyers Need to Know (podcast)

7 Things Small Business Owners Need to Know about Windows 10

Should You Take Advantage of the free Windows 10 upgrade?

Even if you want to keep the Windows version of Windows 7 or Windows 8, ZDNet reports that users can lock in the free Windows 10 upgrade and keep the Windows version (either Window 7 or Windows 8). Check out this article for more information.

Regardless of what you choose, know that your decision is the right one for your practice. Contact us at pmap@scbar.org. We’d love to hear your thoughts and experiences with this.

Written by: Emily Worley, PMAP Assistant, SC Bar

Edited by: Courtney Kennaday, Director, PMAP, SC Bar

DISCLAIMER: This information (or the names of these products are) is passed along without any warranties by the South Carolina Bar as to its fitness for a particular purpose. It has not been tested by the Bar or by the individual below personally and is offered for your information only.

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Should I or Should I Not Upgrade to Windows 10? – A Look at System Software Requirements: Part 1

windows 10

PREFACE: In researching this blog post, we were surprised to find a lot of information for PC users and Attorneys to sort through. We have attempted to highlight the most important information and resources we could find on this subject. We encourage our readers to evaluate your own situation as a Windows user and make the best decision that works for you. Because there is so much information, we will split this post into two parts.

PART 1

QUESTION: Should I or should I not upgrade to Windows 10? 

QUESTION: Do I have the correct system software (operating system) requirements to perform an upgrade to Windows 10? 

Many lawyers are using Windows 7 or 8 but are hesitant to take advantage of the free upgrade offer by Microsoft because they are not sure if it is the right move. Should you take advantage of the free upgrade before July 29 or should you take advice from a sage idiom: “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it?” That choice all depends on the answers you get to several questions (listed below) and how you feel about several pros and cons about upgrading.

For starters, the first question you must ask yourself is what version of Windows 7 or 8 do you own? If you don’t own either and are still running Windows XP, security professionals recommend upgrading your hardware and software. Windows XP is no longer supported by Microsoft with all the OS updates and patches, leaving you vulnerable to malware/ransomware, etc.

If you own Windows 7, there are five editions: Windows 7 Starter, Windows 7 Home Basic, Windows 7 Home Premium edition, Windows 7 Professional, and Windows 7 Ultimate.

For Windows 8 users, there are four possible editions: Windows Phone 8.1, Windows 8.1, Windows 8.1 Pro, and Window 8.1 Pro for Students.

Windows 7 users that own a Starter or Home edition can upgrade to Windows 10 Home and those that own the Windows 7 Professional or Ultimate edition can upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.

Windows 8 users that own the Phone edition can upgrade to Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 8.1 users can upgrade to Windows 10 Home. Like Windows 7, Windows 8 users who own Windows 8.1 Pro or Windows 8.1 Pro for Students can upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.

For a full listing of excluded editions, check out the Microsoft Windows 10 Specifications.

If you are on the fence about upgrading, the Windows Lifecycle sheet, released by Microsoft, shows the support timeline for each Windows operating system dating back to Windows XP. Mainstream support for Windows 7 ended January 13, 2015. What does that mean for Windows 7 users? Well, mainstream support typically refers to free phone and online support, as well as non-security updates. So in other words, Windows 7 is still being supported. Its extended support plan continues through January 14, 2020. Windows 8 end of mainstream support ends January 9, 2018 and the end of extended support ends January 10, 2023.

The second important question to ask yourself is whether you are running the latest version of Windows 7 SP1 or Windows 8.1 Update? If you’re not sure, check here to find out.

If you discover you’re not running the latest update, you can click on the Windows 10 Specifications link above to download the latest version of Windows 7 SP1 or Windows 8.1 Update.

While all this information may sound like a bunch of gobbly gook, it is important to carefully check each question above to find out if your system software meets the system requirements.

Stay tuned next week for Should I or Should I Not Upgrade to Windows 10? – Part 2 – What hardware & application software requirements should I evaluate before upgrading to Windows 10? And, what other resources are out there to help me make my decision?

Written by: Emily Worley, PMAP Assistant, SC Bar

Edited by: Courtney Kennaday, Director, PMAP, SC Bar

DISCLAIMER: This information (or the names of these products are) is passed along without any warranties by the South Carolina Bar as to its fitness for a particular purpose. It has not been tested by the Bar or by the individual below personally and is offered for your information only.

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Browse Statutes in Outline View (using Fastcase)

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With electronic sources, sometimes the fastest way to find the statute section that you are looking for is to browse the statute in Outline View.  Using Outline View on Fastcase, you can see the “table of contents view” of the entire code and easily toggle back and forth between different individual statutes.

Example: If you wanted to browse the U.S. Code to find 29 U.S.C. § 2611, you would follow these steps:

  1. Select Search Statutes from the Search menu.
  1. Above the text box, there are two tabs, a Search tab, and a Browse tab. Click on the Browse tab.
  1. A list of our searchable jurisdictions will appear. Select S. Code from the list of statutes and jurisdictions by clicking on the plus sign next to “United States Code.”  This will bring you to an expandable outline of the U.S. Code.  Choose which edition of the U.S. Code you want to search by clicking on the plus sign next to the applicable edition.
  1. Initially, you will see a list of the Titles within the Code. Click on the plus sign next to each Title to view the Chapters within each Title.  Then click on the plus sign next to Chapter to view each Section.
  • Scroll down and expand Title 29 Labor.
  • Then scroll down and expand Chapter 28 Family and Medical Leave.
  • Finally, scroll down a bit further and expand Subchapter I, then click on Section 2611 Definitions.

The statute text will open up in the panel on the right while the outline of the code remains in the panel on the left.

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