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Posts published in “Cybercrime”

Is that really technical support? Scam Alert!

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In the past, you may have been targeted by scammers claiming to be technical support from Microsoft, Apple, a printer company, or internet service provider due to a recent purchase or technical issue. In many of those instances, the scammer likely called you.

Recently, the FBI reported an increase in technical support bait and hook tactics, including the user being fooled to call the scammer!

Before you dismiss this reoccurring scam, be sure to review with your staff the variations, trends, and tips from the FBI and ZDNet.

Contact pmap@scbar.org if you have any questions.

Three Quick Tips on How to Reduce Spam Telemarketing

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Are you the victim of annoying telemarketing, spam or robotic phone calls?

Did you know that there are several ways to reduce spam calls?

First, add your phone number to the national “Do Not Call” registry. Educate your firm on frequent fraud such as the “Not Your Neighbor Calling” scam.

For mobile phones, consider using caller id and call blocking apps in the Apple or Google Play stores such as HiyaMr. Number and RoboKiller.

Also, research your phone and carrier settings to see if any built-in call-blocking options are available.

For additional ideas on how to block unwanted calls, click here. Contact pmap@scbar.org with questions.

New Year’s Predictions: What Could Happen with Legal Technology in 2018

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It's a new year and many leading legal experts have made their predictions about what to expect and what could happen with legal technology in 2018.

Findlaw.com made three tech predictions – that legal bots will become more common, legal developers will find more uses for blockchain in the form of smart contracts and new cyber attacks will continue to shake the world.

The MyCase blog predictions include the rapid adoption of cloud services such as Office 365.

Also, that AI (artificial intelligence) is already becoming embedded in all kinds of software (legal research provider Fastcase is working to make AI available to lawyers), email will soon become a disfavored avenue of communication with clients and more lawyers will need to develop niche practices to combat alternative legal providers online.

For even more predictions, download Bluelock, LLC’s 2018 Legal Technology Predictions white paper.

Contact pmap@scbar.org with questions.

How to Prevent Scams from Quickly Happening to your Firm

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When it comes to scams, experts say, it is not a matter of IF a law firm will be targeted but WHEN. Law firm data is some of the most coveted and confidential hidden treasure in the world. Hackers and scammers know data is a precious resource...so, as a law firm, you, are their big red target.

What are some ways you can better prepare your solo, small, medium, or large firm for some of the wackiest, craziest, and disguised scams? Check out our 20 tips below.

20 Tips for Law Firms on How to Educate and Prevent Scams

1.      Follow the FTC website and US-CERT for privacy, identity, and online security updates.

2.      Hire certified professionals to support/update your computer hardware and software.

3.      Update anti-virus/security software on a regular basis. This is especially important with ransomware like WannaCry and a cyberthreat called Petya roaming the internet.

4.      Make sure your pop-up filter is up-to-date (comes with most security software).

5.      Always check links before clicking on them. Look for misspellings or other irregularities. Hover over the link before you click on it.

6.      Always make sure site URLS indicate HTTPS before using them.

7.      Email messages from friends or from companies you trust require scrutiny. Treat emails, links, and attachments with suspicion. Call to verify that entity/friend sent it to you.

8.      Don’t follow links in bank emails, etc. Instead use your browser to enter the URL.

9.      Never use public Wi-Fi or hotspots. Be careful with private Wi-Fi connections that you are not sure what the security measures are.

10. Contact hardware/software companies directly for assistance. Do not trust companies that contact you directly (with the initiated call).

11. Never allow a “company” (no matter who) perform a “free security scan”.

12. If you get a call from a company or someone claiming to be tech support, hang up.

13. If you get a pop-up message that tells you to call tech support, ignore it.

14. If your computer brings up a concern you are not sure about, call your security software company directly but do not use the phone number in the pop-up or on caller ID. Instead, look for the company’s contact information online or on a software package or your receipt.

15. Never share your passwords or give control to your computer to anyone who contacts you.

16. Change any passwords that you share with someone. Assign unique passphrases to every online account.

17. If you pay for bogus services with a credit card, call the credit card company directly and ask them to reverse the charges.

18. Watch for unauthorized charges to your accounts. Also, watch for unauthorized activity on your computers.

19. Never reveal personal or financial information in emails or text messages.

20. Report scams to www.ftc.gov/complaint. Report computer security incidents to US-CERT https://www.us-cert.gov/forms/report and the FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx.

P.S. If you've been impacted by a scam or technical attack that your fellow Bar members should know about, please share your experience with us by emailing pmap@scbar.org.