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Posts published in “Tips”

Business Card Strategies

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Let me make this perfectly clear: your business card says a lot about you. When I open the desk drawer with my Rolodex and piles of rubber-banded cards, it's like pulling open a drawer of memories. (It also reminds me that I need to scan them with my Fujitsu ScanSnap and save them with CardMinder.)

In some cultures, it is considered correct business politesse to hold the card presented to you with both hands, observe it, and comment, before putting it carefully in your wallet.

I have my own rules for business cards, to wit:
• Make sure someone can read your card easily without glasses or a magnifying glass (the “over age 40” rule).
• If you use your domain name in your email address, make sure you also have a web page with that domain name.
• Send two business cards to each client at the close of your case and ask them to refer you business.
• Whenever you give your card, give three (one for that person and two for friends).
• Use both sides of the card – include your practice areas on one side, a map to your office, or a piece of advice.
• Make it unique and easy to spot.

Making your card unique and easy to spot is tricky in the rather conservative field of lawyering. You want the impression you make to be favorable, so keep that in mind before you get too wild and crazy. And if inexpensive business cards are what you seek, the Internet is a good place to go. Try Vistaprint, but don't forget to give your local supplier a chance to compete.

Are you Ergo?

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Ergonomic, that is. I don’t need statistics to convince you that anyone who works in a law office spends a huge portion of her (and his) time sitting at a desk.  I do, and I’m guessing you do too.  Studies have found that ergonomic disorders are practically a pandemic problem in the U.S. What you are sitting on is every bit as important as your keyboard, monitor(s) and desk.

Recently, I decided to purchase a new chair to use at work. Checking out my co-workers' offices, there seemed to be a variety of seating options – from a traditional executive chair for our executive director (that figures) to an exercise ball/chair used by our risk management counsel (see the slideshow below). You'll notice I found a lot of cushions and ergo add-ons too.

After much Internet research, I visited local office furniture stores to try some chairs on for size. I felt somewhat like Goldilocks, searching for the chair that was “just right.” Luckily, I found a chair that offered enough customizable positions and possible adjustments to suit even my finicky tastes. After more than six months, I’m still happy with my chair and no longer see it as a medieval instrument of torture. In fact, most of the time I don’t think about my chair at all, which frees me to concentrate on my work.

What did I buy? A Steelcase Leap Chair.  Do you have a favorite chair? What about an ergonomic solution that might help other desk dwellers? Share your comments here.